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The Child Care Center will open, as normal, Monday, September 22.

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The Child Care Center will open, as normal, Monday, September 22.

School of Health, Wellness & Public Safety

Last Updated: 

Jun 1 2014

The Associate Degree Nursing curriculum provides knowledge, skills, and strategies to integrate safety and quality into nursing care, to practice in a dynamic environment, and to meet individual needs which impact health, quality of life, and achievement of potential.

Course work includes and builds upon the domains of healthcare, nursing practice, and the holistic individual. Content emphasizes the nurse as a member of the interdisciplinary team providing safe, individualized care while employing evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and informatics.

Graduates of the program are eligible to apply to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN). Employment opportunities are vast within the global health care system and may include positions within acute, chronic, extended, industrial, and community health care facilities.

The Associate Degree Nursing program consists of two optons: Traditional ADN and Hybrid LPN to ADN. Upon successful completion of this program, the graduate should possess the knowledge, fundamental skill, and attitudes to:

  1. Plan holistic nursing care for individuals across the lifespan experiencing complex alterations in health. 
  2. Provide safe, culturally competent, therapeutic nursing care to individuals. 
  3. Safely and ethically manage nursing care within the healthcare system for individuals.

Accreditation:

The Associate Degree Nursing program is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing, Inc., 3343 Peachtree Rd., NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326, 404.975.5000 and approved by the North Carolina Board of Nursing.

Technical Standards:

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of registered nursing. These technical standards are published in the application packet for admission to health programs and the Student Handbook.

Admission Requirements: 

Traditional Option 

To be eligible for admission to the Traditional ADN option applicants must: 

1. Complete the application process as described in the Admission Packet

2. Demonstrate physical and emotional health status compatible with the ability to provide safe nursing care.

3. Complete an approved Nursing Assistant I training course consisting of 70 hours of training, which includes 40 hours of clinical instruction and be listed as a NAI with no substantiated findings prior to first day of the Fall semester.

4. Be currently certified in Healthcare provider CPR prior to the first day of the Fall semester.

LPN to ADN Option 

Currently licensed LPNs may elect to take courses in the hybrid LPN to ADN Option. Upon successfully completing both courses in this option, students will receive credit for NUR 111, NUR 112, NUR 113, NUR 114 and NUR 211.

The following are Admissions criteria for applicants to the hybrid LPN to ADN option.

  1. Have completed all required ADN support courses with a “C” or better.
  2. Have completed the application process as described in the admission packet.
  3. Have graduated from an approved Practical Nurse Education program.
  4. Hold an unrestricted North Carolina or compact state license as an LPN.
  5. Have 12 months full-time experience or part-time equivalent to 12 months as an LPN in a medical/surgical unit in an acute care hospital or in a skilled nursing facility within the last four years. There are no exceptions to this requirement.
  6. Have achieved an acceptable score on a nursing entrance test. -- Nace Test Information
  7. Have physical and emotional health status compatible with the ability to provide safe nursing care.
  8. Have signed and submitted Statement for Provision of Clinical Site and Preceptor.
  9. Be currently certified in Healthcare Provider CPR prior to the first day of the Fall semester.

Probation and Suspension

Nursing students are subject to the same probation and suspension policies as all other students enrolled in the College. Additional criteria apply to nursing students. 

Since requirements for progression in the nursing program are in addition to the general requirements of the College, a student suspended from the program is not necessarily suspended from the College. Students who are eligible to do so may continue in their supporting courses and apply for readmission to the nursing program at a later time or may elect to change their major.

Criminal Background Check

A criminal background check and drug screen testing are required by the clinical site prior to participation in the clinical component.

If any clinical facility refuses to allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in that clinical agency, the student will not be able to progress in the program.

Applicants for initial nursing licensure in North Carolina must must complete a criminal background check as well. 

Associate Degree Nursing:
 Associate in Applied Science Degree Program

1st Fall

Anatomy & Physiology I (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

4.00
General Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Introduction to Health Concepts

Credit Hours: 

8.00

1st Spring

Anatomy & Physiology II (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Developmental Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Health-Illness Concepts

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Health Care Concepts

Credit Hours: 

5.00

Summer

Health System Concepts

Credit Hours: 

5.00

2nd Fall

Family Health Concepts

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Holistic Health Concepts

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Critical Thinking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Spring

Argument-Based Research (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Public Speaking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Complex Health Concepts

Credit Hours: 

10.00

Associate Degree Nursing - LPN to ADN:
 Associate in Applied Science Degree Program

All of the following courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or better prior to acceptance into this option.
BIO 165 Anatomy & Physiology I (DRE 098)
BIO 166 Anatomy & Physiology II (BIO 165)
ENG 111 Expository Writing (DRE 098 & CTS 080)
ENG 112 Writing/Research in the Disciplines
PSY 241 Developmental Psychology (PSY 150)
PSY 150 General Psychology (DRE 098)
COM 231 Public Speaking (ENG 111)
HUM 115 Critical Thinking (DRE 098, CTS 080)
* Upon successful completion of NUR 221 and 223, credit is awarded for NUR 111, 112, 113, 114, and 211.

Fall

LPN to ADN Concepts I

Credit Hours: 

9.00

Spring

LPN to ADN Concepts II

Credit Hours: 

9.00

Basic Law Enforcement Training (BLET) is designed to give students essential skills required for entry-level employment as law enforcement officers with state, county, or municipal governments, or with private enterprise.

This program utilizes State-commission-mandated topics and methods of instruction totaling 632 hours. General subjects include, but are not limited to, criminal, juvenile, civil, traffic, and alcoholic beverage laws; investigative, patrol, custody, and court procedures; emergency responses; and ethics and community relations.

Successful graduates receive a curriculum certificate and are qualified to take certification examinations mandated by the North Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission and/or the North Carolina Sheriffs’ Education and Training Standards Commission.

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of criminal, juvenile, civil, traffic, and alcoholic beverage control laws.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in defensive tactics, first responder, law enforcement driving, physical fitness, and firearms techniques.
  3. Demonstrate proper criminal investigation and traffic accident investigation procedures.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of effective officer interaction with victims, citizens, and special populations.
  5. Demonstrate proper law enforcement patrol techniques.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of accepted custody procedures.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of proper court procedures.

Technical Standards:

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are technical standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability, and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of add program name Basic Law Enforcement. These technical standards are available from the academic advisor or the director for BLET

Admission Requirements: 

The following are admissions criteria for applicants to the Basic Law Enforcement Training (BLET) program. Applicants for admission to the BLET Program must:

  1. Have completed and submitted to the Admissions Office a college application for admission.
  2. Have completed the College’s assessment process and achieved acceptable scores.
  3. Have graduated from high school or have an Adult High School Diploma or have passed the GED with an equivalency certificate, which meets the minimum requirements set by the State of North Carolina. Official high school transcript or copy of AHS Diploma/GED Certificate must be on file in the Admissions Office.
  4. Meet the minimum standards for employment as established by the N.C. Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission and/or the N.C. Sheriffs’ Education and Training Standards Commission which include:
    a. be a citizen of the United States;
    b. be at least 20 years of age (must be 20 years of age as of the first day of class or have prior written authorization from the Director of the Criminal Justice Standards Division if less than 20 years old);
    c. be of good moral character; and
    d. be examined and certified by a licensed physician or surgeon to meet the physical requirements necessary to perform the functions of a law enforcement officer.
  5. Have not ever committed or been convicted of any of the following:
    a. a felony;
    b. a crime for which the punishment could have been imprisonment for more than two years;
    c. a crime or unlawful act for which the punishment could have been imprisonment for more than six months but less than two years and the crime or unlawful act occurred within the last five years;
    d. four or more crimes or unlawful acts described in “c” above regardless of the date of occurrence; or
    e. four or more crimes or unlawful acts for which the punishment could have been imprisonment for less than six months.
  6. Be sponsored for Basic Law Enforcement Training by a Law Enforcement Agency. NOTE: Sponsorship must be retained throughout the BLET program for the student to remain enrolled.
  7. Be interviewed by the Director of the BLET Program or the Associate Dean, Health, Wellness & Public Safety, or their designee.
  8. Have signed and submitted the Statement of Understanding Concerning Acceptance for Basic Law Enforcement Training.
  9. Possess a valid North Carolina driver’s license.

Basic Law Enforcement Training
: Certificate Program

NOTE: Special legal requirements exist which may limit the ability of an individual to obtain pre-employment experience, employment, or licensure in this field. Prospective students should obtain additional information from a College counselor or program faculty member prior to seeking admission.

Students enrolled in Basic Law Enforcement Training must agree and adhere to supplemental Student Code of Conduct specific to the program.

Students who successfully complete Basic Law Enforcement Training will receive 19 semester hours of credit toward the Associate in Applied Science degree in Criminal Justice. Students will receive credit for the following courses:

 

Major Courses

Basic Law Enforcement Training
Law Enforcement Operations (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Criminal Law

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Court Procedure & Evidence

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Investigative Principles

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Constitutional Law

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Civil Liability

Credit Hours: 

3.00

The Cancer Information Management curriculum is designed to provide individuals with the knowledge and skills necessary to maintain a cancer data collection system that is consistent with medical, administrative, ethical, legal, and accreditation requirements.

Students will analyze health records according to standards set by various agencies, compile, maintain, monitor, and report cancer data for research, quality management, facility planning and marketing, abstract and code clinical data, and obtain survival data through yearly follow-up

Graduates may be eligible to take the national certifying examination given by the National Cancer Registrars Association to become a Certified Tumor Registrar (CTR). Employment opportunities include health care facilities, data organizations, and government agencies.

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  1. Display professionalism by projecting a positive attitude, working as a team member, showing initiative and responsibility, and displaying sensitivity to cultural diversity. 
  2. Compile, maintain, monitor, and report cancer data for research, quality management, facility planning, and marketing.
  3. Integrate legal and ethical principles into job responsibilities.
  4. Demonstrate the academic knowledge and technical skills for the entry-level cancer registrar.
  5. Perform statistical analysis related to descriptive and analytic epidemiology and cancer surveillance.
  6. Use current technologies to access and process information.
  7. Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills with consumers and coworkers. 

Accreditation:

The Cancer Information Management education program in Cancer Registry Management at Davidson County Community College is accredited by the National Cancer Registrars Association, 1340 Braddock Place, Suite 203, Alexandria, VA 22314.

Technical Standards:

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of cancer information management. These technical standards are published in the application for admission to health programs and the student handbook.

Admission Requirements:

Students must be admitted to the Cancer Information Management program before enrolling in courses with a CIM prefix. Qualified applicants are admitted to the program based on the date of completion of admission requirements until the program is filled. 

Applicants for admission to the Cancer Information Technology program must:

  1. Complete the requirements for admission as described in the Cancer Information Management & Histotechnology Packet.

Progression Requirements

A student must meet all prerequisite and corequisite CIM course requirements with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress in the program.

Criminal Background Check

A criminal background check and drug screen testing are required by the clinical site prior to participation in the clinical component.

If any clinical facility refuses to allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in that clinical agency, the student will not be able to progress in the program.

Cancer Information Management: 
Associate in Applied Science Degree Program

NOTE: Special legal requirements exist which may limit the ability of an individual to obtain clinical experience, employment, or certification in the Cancer Information Management field. Prospective students should obtain additional information from a College counselor or program faculty member prior to seeking admission.

1st Fall

Anatomy & Physiology I (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Medical Terminology I

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Quantitative Literacy (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Fundamentals of HIM

Credit Hours: 

3.00

1st Spring

Anatomy & Physiology II (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Medical Terminology II

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Interpersonal Communication (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Basic PC Literacy

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Critical Thinking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

1st Summer

General Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Pathophysiology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Fall

Registry Organization & Management

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Cancer Disease Management

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Cancer Statistics & Epidemiology

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Abstracting Principles & Practice I

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Principles of Disease

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Spring

Abstracting Principles & Practice II

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Cancer Patient Follow-Up

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Oncology Coding & Staging Systems

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Professional Directed Practice

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Management Principles in HIT

Credit Hours: 

3.00

The Central Sterile Processing curriculum is designed to prepare individuals for the field of Sterile Processing and Central Service Supply. 

Students will develop skills necessary to properly disinfect, prepare process, store, and issue both sterile and nonsterile supplies and equipment for patient care.  Also, students will learn to operate sterilizing units and monitor effectiveness of the sterilization process.

Graduates will receive a certificate and may be eligible to apply to take the National Institute for Certification of Healthcare Sterile Processing and Distribution Personnel Examination (CBSPD).  Employment opportunities include surgery centers, dialysis facilities, and central processing units in hospitals.

Competencies:

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills with coworkers in the role of a sterile processing technician.
  2. Use critical thinking to recognize, analyze, and solve problems related to sterile processing.
  3. Demonstrate competency in the knowledge and skills required for entry-level  sterile processing technician.
  4. Display professionalism by projecting a positive attitude, working as a team member, showing initiative and responsibility, and displaying sensitivity to cultural diversity. 

Technical Standards:

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of a sterile processing technician. These technical standards are published in the application for admission to health programs and the Student Handbook.

Admission Requirements: 

Applicants for admission to the Central Sterile Processing program must:

 

  1. Complete a DCCC Application for Admission for those not currently enrolled at DCCC.
  2. Submit a High school transcript OR GED score report (High school seniors should submit a current transcript by the deadline).
  3. Submit an OFFICIAL college transcripts from colleges attended. All transcripts are not required, only those in which you plan to transfer credit must be submitted. College transcripts must arrive in original sealed envelopes. Faxed, copied, and on -line transcripts are not acceptable
  4. Placement scores meeting Allied Health placement requirements (or approved equivalent) in the areas of computer skills, sentence skills, reading comprehension, arithmetic and algebra
  5. Allied Health Intent Form submitted to admissions.
  6. Eligibility Review – After completing the requirements above, you are responsible for scheduling an Eligibility Review appointment with your Enrollment Advisor.

 

NOTE: Meeting all admission requirements does not guarantee placement into an allied health program. 

Transfer Credit for Central Sterile Processing Courses

The decision regarding transfer credit for Central Sterile Processing courses is made by the Director of the program in consultation with members of the faculty and the Associate Dean. Syllabi for courses for which credit is requested will be required. 

Progression Requirements

A student must meet all prerequisite and corequisite CSP course requirements with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress in the program. 

Criminal Background Check

A criminal background check and drug screen testing are required by the clinical site prior to participation in the clinical component.

If any clinical facility refuses to allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in the clinical agency, the student will not be able to progress in the program.

Central Sterile Processing: Certificate

First Semester

Intro Sterile Processing

Credit Hours: 

8.00

Choose one bio class from below for 1st semester

Intro to Human Biology

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Basic Anatomy & Physiology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

5.00

Second Semester

Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
STP Clinical Practice

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Prof Success Prep

Credit Hours: 

1.00

The Cosmetology curriculum is designed to provide competency-based knowledge, scientific/artistic principles, and hands-on fundamentals associated with the cosmetology industry. The curriculum provides a simulated salon environment, which enables students to develop manipulative skills.

Course work includes instruction in all phases of professional imaging, hair design, chemical processes, skin care, nail care, multi-cultural practices, business/computer principles, product knowledge, and other selected topics.

Graduates should qualify to sit for the State Board of Cosmetic Arts examination. Upon successfully passing the State Board exam, graduates will be issued a license. Employment is available in beauty salons and as skin/nail specialists, platform artists, and related businesses.

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in skill sets in cosmetology.
  2. Utilize math concepts when identifying and applying color.
  3. Demonstrate proficiency in hair color techniques.
  4. Apply critical thinking skills and basic cosmetology principles to recognize, analyze and solve problems. 
  5. Demonstrate dependability and responsibility while managing self effectively.

Technical Standards: 

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability, and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of Cosmetic Arts. These technical standards are published in the Cosmetic Arts Program Information Packet, Student Handbook.

Admission Requirements: 

The following are admissions criteria for applicants to the Cosmetology program, including Esthetics Technology and Manicuring/Nail Technology.

Applicants for admission to the Cosmetology program must have:

  1. Completed the College’s assessment process and achieved acceptable scores.

In accordance with the North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Arts, please submit an original social security card, tax ID card, or student visa information; in addition, please submit a government issued ID and proof of date of birth to your advisor prior to the first day of class. You will not be able to start Cosmetology class until you complete this requirement.

Projected Costs for Cosmetology

  • Student costs include tuition, fees, and textbooks, plus an implement kit and required uniform.
  • These costs may be covered for students who qualify for financial assistance, and college financial aid staff will assist the student in applying for financial aid.  Financial aid does not pay for summer semester.  *Financial aid for cosmetology is unique based on the credit hour classification.  The semester a student begins and the specific courses taken will determine when students are eligible for financial aid refunds.
  • It is important to apply for admission to the College and financial aid as early as possible.
  • All projected costs are estimates, may vary from term to term, and are subject to change without prior notice

Examples of Costs

In-State Tuition: $1,100 - $1,500
1st semester textbooks: $420
Advanced textbooks/color kits: $310 (not needed during first term)
Implement Kit: $850
Required uniform: $50 - $60
Required nametag: 1st free ($10 to replace)
Reminder: All costs are estimates and subject to change without prior notice

Application/Licensure/Individuals Who Have Been Convicted of Felony

Any applicant convicted of a felony or charged with a felony that is still pending may apply for Board approval upon enrollment in a cosmetic art school. All documentation submitted shall have no effect on an individual’s ability to attend a cosmetic art school, take an examination administered by the Board, or apply for a license; is not binding on the Board with respect to any future application from the individual reviewed; and is not a final agency decision.

Cosmetology: 
Diploma (Fall Start)

1st Fall

Cosmetology Concepts I

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Salon I

Credit Hours: 

8.00
Applied Communications II

Credit Hours: 

3.00

1st Spring

Cosmetology Concepts II

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Salon II

Credit Hours: 

8.00
Interpersonal Psychology

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Summer

Cosmetology Concepts III

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Salon III

Credit Hours: 

6.00

2nd Fall

Cosmetology Concepts IV

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Salon IV

Credit Hours: 

7.00
Contemporary Hair Coloring

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Computerized Salon Operations

Credit Hours: 

1.00

Cosmetology: 
Diploma (Spring Start)

1st Spring

Cosmetology Concepts I

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Salon I

Credit Hours: 

8.00
Applied Communications II

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Summer

Cosmetology Concepts III

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Salon III

Credit Hours: 

6.00

1st Fall

Cosmetology Concepts II

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Salon II

Credit Hours: 

8.00
Interpersonal Psychology

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Spring

Cosmetology Concepts IV

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Salon IV

Credit Hours: 

7.00
Contemporary Hair Coloring

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Computerized Salon Operations

Credit Hours: 

1.00

The Esthetics Technology curriculum provides competency-based knowledge, scientific/artistic principles, and hands-on fundamentals associated with the art of skin care. The curriculum provides a simulated salon environment, which enables students to develop manipulative skills.

The daytime Esthetics program accepts new students every Fall. The evening Esthetics program accepts new students in odd calendar years in the Fall.

Course work includes instruction in all phases of professional Esthetics Technology, business/human relations, product knowledge, and other related topics.

An essential element in the success of the College’s Esthetics program is the opportunity for students to complete their clinical practice in a simulated salon that serves as a learning laboratory. Through supervised hands-on interactions with clients, students practice and demonstrate mastery of competencies needed for successful employment in the field. Former students have rated this real-life experience as critical in the mastery of professional skills and clinical procedures as well as awareness about the  role of the Esthetician in the work environment. 

Graduates should be prepared to take the North Carolina Cosmetology State Board Licensing Exam and upon passing be licensed and qualify for employment in beauty and cosmetic/skin care salons, as a platform artist, and in related businesses.

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in Esthetic treatment skill sets. 
  2. Access and use a variety of resources to remain current in the field of Esthetics. 
  3. Integrate objective and subjective data to create individual treatment plans for clients in a spa setting.

Technical Standards: 

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability, and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of Esthetics Technology. These technical standards are published in the Cosmetic Arts Program Information Packet, Student Handbook, and/or are available from program faculty.

Admission Requirements: 

In accordance with the North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Arts, please submit an original social security card, tax ID card, or student visa information; in addition, please submit a government issued ID and proof of date of birth to your advisor prior to the first day of class. You will not be able to start Esthetics class until you complete this requirement.

Projected  Costs

Tuition & fees, approximate $650/per semester
Book bundle $343 1st semester
Jane Iredale makeup kit $420 1st semester
Implement Kit: $107 1st semester
Required uniform: $47 - $60/eash 1st semester
Required nametag: 1st free ($10 to replace)
Reminder: All costs are estimates and subject to change without prior notice

Certificate - Esthetics (High School Career and College Promise)

What it’s about

The Esthetics Technology curriculum provides competency-based knowledge, scientific/artistic principles, and hands-on fundamentals associated with the art of skin care. The curriculum provides a simulated salon environment, which enables students to develop manipulative skills.

What you can get

Upon successful completion of all courses in this CCP pathway, the student will be awarded a Certificate in Esthetics from DCCC. After completing the program, the student will be eligible to take the NC State Board of Cosmetology Licensing Exams for licensure as an Esthetician.

Program Specific Details

Tuition and Fees FREE
Textbooks $350.00
Implement Kit $107.00
Jane Iredale Makeup Kit $420.00
Uniforms $60

ESTIMATED TOTAL COST (Student Responsible) $937.00
*Costs subject to change.

Minimum Placement Test Scores

Reading & Sentence Skills - 129
Math Score - 7
Math Modules - 010-030

After High School

Ready to take State Licensure Exam.

High School Senior Year (Fall)

Esthetics Concepts I

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Esthetics Salon I

Credit Hours: 

6.00

High School Senior Year (Spring)

Esthetics Concepts II

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Esthetics Salon II

Credit Hours: 

6.00

The Criminal Justice Technology curriculum is designed to provide knowledge of criminal justice systems and operations. Study will focus on local, state, and federal law enforcement, judicial processes, corrections, and security services. The criminal justice system’s role within society will be explored.

Emphasis is on criminal justice systems, criminology, juvenile justice, criminal and constitutional law, investigative principles, ethics, and community relations. Additional study may include issues and concepts of government, communications, computers, and technology.

Employment opportunities exist in a variety of local, state, and federal law enforcement, corrections, and security fields. Examples include police officer, deputy sheriff, county detention officer, state trooper, intensive probation/parole surveillance officer, correctional officer, loss prevention specialist, wildlife officer, and alcohol enforcement officer.

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  1. Use critical thinking to identify the fundamental building blocks and rules of investigation. Identify the elements of crimes, apply constitutional principles, and avoid civil liability.
  2. Communicate effectively through listening, speaking, and writing in courtroom testimony, documentation, and interaction with team members and the public.
  3. Identify terms, positions, roles, equipment, and techniques to work effectively and efficiently in teams.

Technical Standards:

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are technical standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability, and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of add program name Criminal Justice. These technical standards are available from the academic advisor or program faculty. 

Criminal Justice Technology
: Associate in Applied Science Degree Program

NOTE: Special legal requirements exist which may limit the ability of an individual to obtain pre-employment experience, employment, or licensure in this field. Prospective students should obtain additional information from a College counselor or program faculty member prior to seeking admission.

1st Fall

Introduction to Criminal Justice (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Law Enforcement Operations (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Criminal Law

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Basic PC Literacy

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Juvenile Justice

Credit Hours: 

3.00

1st Spring

Criminology

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Court Procedure & Evidence

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Corrections (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Terrorism: Underlying Issues

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Ethics & Community Relations

Credit Hours: 

3.00

1st Summer

Interpersonal Communication (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Professional Research & Reporting (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Fall

Investigative Principles

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Constitutional Law

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Critical Thinking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Quantitative Literacy (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
General Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Spring

Civil Liability

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Victimology

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Criminalistics

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Choose one course from below for 2nd Spring

Organization & Administration

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Organized Crime

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Certificate - Criminal Justice Technology (High School Career and College Promise)

After High School

Hours Needed to Complete Diploma: not available
Hours Needed to Complete Associate Degree: 47 

What it’s about

The Criminal Justice Technology curriculum is designed to provide knowledge of criminal justice systems and operations. Study will focus on local, state, and federal law enforcement, judicial processes, corrections, and security services. The criminal justice system’s role within society will be explored.

What you can get

Upon successful completion of all courses in this CCP pathway, the student will be awarded a Certificate in Criminal Justice from DCCC.

Minimum Placement Test Scores

Reading & Sentence Skills -165
Math Score - 7
Math Modules - 010-030

High School Junior Year (Fall)

Introduction to Criminal Justice (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Juvenile Justice

Credit Hours: 

3.00

High School Junior Year (Spring)

Corrections (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Criminology

Credit Hours: 

3.00

High School Senior Year (Fall)

Criminal Law

Credit Hours: 

3.00

High School Senior Year (Spring)

Court Procedure & Evidence

Credit Hours: 

3.00

The Emergency Medical Science curriculum is designed to prepare graduates to enter the workforce as paramedics. Additionally, the program can provide an Associate degree for individuals desiring an opportunity for career enhancement.

The course of study provides the student an opportunity to acquire basic and advanced life support knowledge and skills by utilizing classroom instruction, practical laboratory sessions, hospital clinical experience, and field internships with emergency medical service agencies.

Students progressing through the program may be eligible to apply for both state and national certification exams. Employment opportunities include ambulance services, fire and rescue agencies, air medical services, specialty areas of hospitals, industry, educational institutions, and government agencies.

The Emergency Medical Science student should:

  1. Perform rapid systematic patient assessment to patients of any age and diverse cultural backgrounds to determine and implement safe, ethical, legal, and appropriate care, utilizing basic and sophisticated medical devices, and the therapeutic pharmacology at entry-level competence.
  2. During lab simulations, clinical and field internship experiences safely utilize situational appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) in accordance with current infection control policies at entry-level competence.
  3. Demonstrate professional and effective use of verbal, non-verbal and written communications techniques at entry-level competence.
  4. Outside of classroom assignments, seek out opportunities for personal and professional growth.
  5. Through lab simulations and actual driving evolutions build a foundation for the safe operation of emergency vehicles in routine and emergency situations.
  6. Perform as a competent entry-level Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills) and affective (behavior) learning domains.

Technical Standards: 

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability, and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of Emergency Medical Science. These technical standards are published in the Student Handbook.

Admission Requirements: 

Policies Regarding EMS Admission with Advanced Standing

The general admission requirements of the College and of the EMS program apply to persons seeking admission into the EMS program with advanced standing. Those applying for advanced standing must have previously completed an Emergency Medical Technician-Basic, EMT-Intermediate, or EMT-Paramedic educational program and hold National Registry registration, or a credential from the North Carolina Medical Care Commission. Credit may be granted for the following courses, dependent on the level and combination of credentials:

EMS 110, EMS 150, EMS 121, EMS 130, EMS 131, EMS 220, EMS 221, EMS 231, EMS 240, EMS 241, EMS 250, EMS 260, EMS 270, EMS 285.

Students will be awarded a grade of “T” and credit hours for the courses are awarded. No quality points are awarded and the grade is not included in the grade point average.

Transfer Credit for EMS Courses

The decision regarding transfer credit for EMS courses is made by the Associate Dean, Health, Wellness, and Public Safety, in consultation with members of the Emergency Medical Science faculty. 

Paramedics satisfying the requirements for Advanced Standing will be admitted to the EMS Bridging program. Students admitted to the the EMS Bridging program must complete at least 18 hours of the required courses in the EMS program at Davidson County Community College.

Challenge Examinations for EMS Courses 

State credentialed EMTs, EMT-Intermediates, or Paramedics who do not hold National Registry registration or a North Carolina credential may challenge EMS courses appropriate for their certification level. Specific information regarding challenge examinations for these courses will be provided to applicants upon request. (Refer to general requirements for more information about requesting Credit by Examination.)

Progression Requirements

A student must meet all prerequisite and corequisite EMS course requirements with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress in the program.

Probation and Suspension

EMS students are subject to the same probation and suspension policies as all other students enrolled in the College.  Additional criteria for EMS apply.

Since requirements for progression in the EMS program are in addition to the general requirements of the College, a student suspended from the program is not necessarily suspended from the College. 

Criminal Background Check

A criminal background check and drug screen testing are required by the clinical site prior to participation in the clinical component.

If any clinical facility refuses to allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in that clinical agency, the student will not be able to progress in the program.

Emergency Medical Science
: Associate in Applied Science Degree Program

NOTE: Special legal requirements exist which may limit the ability of an individual to obtain clinical experience, employment, or certification in this field. Prospective students should obtain additional information from a College counselor or program faculty member prior to seeking admission.

1st Fall

Basic Anatomy & Physiology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Emergency Vehicles & EMS Communication

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Student Success Strategies

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Survey of Medical Terminology

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Quantitative Literacy (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Rescue Scene Management

Credit Hours: 

2.00

1st Spring

EMT - Basic

Credit Hours: 

8.00
EMS Clinical Practicum I

Credit Hours: 

1.00
Pharmacology

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Critical Thinking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Summer

Advanced Airway Management

Credit Hours: 

2.00
EMS Clinical Practicum II

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Cardiology I

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Patients W/ Special Challenges

Credit Hours: 

2.00

2nd Fall

Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
EMS Clinical Practicum III

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Cardiology II

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Trauma Emergencies

Credit Hours: 

2.00
General Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Spring

EMS Clinical Practicum IV

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Medical Emergencies

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Life Span Emergencies

Credit Hours: 

3.00
EMS Capstone

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Professional Research & Reporting (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Emergency Medical Science: Associate in Applied Science Degree Program (Bridging Option)


Bridging Option for Currently Credentialed EMT-Paramedics

Degree requires 66 semester hours. Through the bridging program, currently credentialed EMT-Paramedics receive 42 semester hours of advanced placement. The remaining course work to complete the A.A.S. in Emergency Medical Science requires 24 additional semester hours of work outlined above. Students must take 17 hours from the required courses to meet the residency requirements of DCCC, or challenge exams in EMS prefix courses for residency hour requirements. Students may transfer in up to 10 semester hours required for the degree.

Rescue Scene Management

Credit Hours: 

2.00
EMS Management

Credit Hours: 

2.00
EMS Bridging Course

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Professional Research & Reporting (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Basic Anatomy & Physiology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

5.00
General Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Critical Thinking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

The Fire Protection Technology curriculum is designed to provide individuals with technical and professional knowledge to make decisions regarding fire protection for both public and private sectors. It also provides a sound foundation for continuous higher learning in fire protection, administration, and management.

Course work includes classroom and laboratory exercises to introduce the student to various aspects of fire protection. Students will learn technical and administrative skills such as hydraulics, hazardous materials, arson investigation, fire protection safety, fire suppression management, law, and codes. 

Graduates should qualify for employment or advancement in government agencies, industrial firms, insurance rating organizations, educational organizations, and municipal fire departments. Employed persons should have opportunities for skilled and supervisory-level positions within their current organizations.

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate effective, professional written and oral communication skills with individuals in a variety of fire service settings.
  2. Use and apply critical thinking skills and basic fire protection supervision and management principles to recognize, analyze and solve problems.
  3. Demonstrate the technical skills necessary to function in operations, command, supervision and management.
  4. Assess and utilize internal and external resources to manage an emergency scene effectively.

Technical Standards: 

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of fire protection. These technical standards are published in the Student Handbook and/or are available from program faculty.

Fire Protection Technology (High School Career and College Promise)

After High School

Hours Needed to Complete Diploma: n/a
Hours Needed to Complete Associate Degree: 50

What it’s about

The Fire Protection Technology curriculum is designed to provide individuals with technical and professional knowledge to make decisions regarding fire protection for both public and private sectors. It also provides a sound foundation for continuous higher learning in fire protection, administration, and management.

What you can get

Upon successful completion of all courses in this pathway, the student will be awarded a Fire Core Certificate from DCCC. Students can complete additional certificates to earn an Associate’s Degree in Fire Protection Technology after graduating from High School.

Minimum Placement Test Scores

Reading & Sentence Skills - 165
Math Score - 7
Math Modules - 010-030

High School Senior Year (Fall)

Introduction to Fire Protection

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Fire Protection & Public Education

Credit Hours: 

3.00

High School Senior Year (Spring)

Building Construction

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Fire Protection Law

Credit Hours: 

3.00

After High School (Complete Fire Core Certificate)

Fire Fighting Strategies

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Local Govt Finance

Credit Hours: 

3.00

The Healthcare Interpreting curriculum prepares individuals proficient in English and a target language to work in a healthcare environment as entry-level bilingual professionals, providing communication access to care and services to those whose language of preference is other than English. 

Course work includes an overview of the American healthcare system, roles and responsibilities of the healthcare interpreter, ethical issues, basic human anatomy and physiology, and medical terminology. Students will acquire skills associated with interpretation between English and a target language. 

Graduates should qualify for entry-level jobs as professional bilingual interpreters in a variety of healthcare settings. The healthcare settings may include hospitals, physician offices, clinics, health departments or apply language skills to other human service related areas.

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate effective, professional written and oral communication skills with clients and with appropriate individuals in a variety of healthcare settings.
  2. Use critical thinking to recognize and analyze situations and to provide communication access to care and services to those whose language of preference is other than English.
  3. Use technology and other resources in the administrative functions of healthcare interpreting. 
  4. Display professionalism by projecting a positive and understanding attitude, working as an advocate for the non-English speaking client, and showing initiative and responsibility. 
  5. Work with the non-English speaking client and with healthcare agencies in a legal and ethical manner.

Technical Standards:

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of healthcare interpreting. These technical standards are published in the application for admission to health programs and the Student Handbook.

Admission Requirements:

Qualified applicants are admitted to the program based on selective ranking criteria.

Applicants for admission to the Healthcare Interpreting program must:

  1. Complete the requirements for admission as described in the HCI Packet.

Transfer Credit for Healthcare Interpreting Courses

The decision regarding transfer credit for healthcare interpreting courses is made by the Director of the program in consultation with members of the faculty and the Assistant Dean. Syllabi for courses for which credit is requested will be required.

Progression Requirements

A student must meet all prerequisite and corequisite HCI course requirements with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress in the program.

Criminal Background Check

A criminal background check and drug screen testing are required by the clinical site prior to participation in the clinical component.

If any clinical facility refuses to allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in that clinical agency, the student will not be able to progress in the program.

Healthcare Interpreting
: Associate in Applied Science Degree Program

1st Fall

Review of Grammar

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Survey of Medical Terminology

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Basic Anatomy & Physiology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Healthcare in the U.S.

Credit Hours: 

1.00

1st Spring

Medical Communication

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Transcultural Healthcare

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Analytical Skills for Interpreters

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Introduction to Healthcare Interpreting

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Summer

Strategies for Medical Interpreters

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Interpersonal Communication (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
General Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Fall

HCI Clinical Practicum I

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Cultural Health Habits

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Informatics for Interpreters

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Professional Interactions in Health Care

Credit Hours: 

1.00
Medical Law & Ethics

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Quantitative Literacy (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Spring

HCI Clinical Practicum II

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Critical Thinking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Professional Issues

Credit Hours: 

3.00

The Health Information Technology curriculum prepares individuals with the knowledge and skills to process, analyze, abstract, compile, maintain, manage, and report health information. 

Students will supervise departmental functions; classify, code and index diagnoses and procedures; coordinate information for cost control, quality management, statistics, marketing, and planning; monitor governmental and non-governmental standards; facilitate research; and design system controls to monitor patient information security.

Graduates of this program may be eligible to write the national certification examination to become a Registered Health Information Technician (RHIT). Employment opportunities include hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, nursing homes, health insurance organizations, outpatient clinics, physicians’ offices, hospice, and mental health facilities.

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate effective, professional written and oral communication skills with consumers and co-workers.
  2. Use and apply critical thinking skills and basic health information management principles to recognize, analyze, and solve problems.
  3. Perform and interpret math calculations related to descriptive healthcare statistics. 
  4. Use current technology to access and process health information. 
  5. Demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary for entry-level health information competencies.
  6. Practice in a legal, ethical, and professional manner by demonstrating responsibility, initiative, positive attitudes toward those of diverse backgrounds, integrity, time management skills, and the ability to work in teams in a healthcare setting.

Accreditation:

The Health Information Technology program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM).

Technical Standards:

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of health information technology. These technical standards are published in the application for admission to health programs and the Student Handbook and/or are available from program faculty.

Admission Requirements:

Qualified applicants are admitted to the program based on selective ranking criteria.

Applicants for admission to the Health Information Technology program must:

  1. Complete the requirements for admission as described in the Allied Health Packet.

Transfer Credit for Health Information Technology Courses

The decision regarding transfer credit for health information courses is made by the Director of the program in consultation with members of the faculty and the Assistant Dean. Syllabi for courses for which credit is requested will be required.

Progression Requirements

A grade of “C” or better is required in all HIT, MED, BIO, and ENG prefix courses.

Criminal Background Check

A criminal background check and drug testing are required by the clinical site prior to participation in the clinical component.

If any clinical facility refuses to allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in that clinical agency, the student will not be able to progress in the program.

Health Information Technology: 
Associate in Applied Science Degree Program

NOTE: Special legal requirements exist which may limit the ability of an individual to obtain clinical experience, employment, or certification in the Health Information field. Prospective students should obtain additional information from a College counselor or program faculty member prior to seeking admission.

1st Fall

Anatomy & Physiology I (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Medical Terminology I

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Fundamentals of HIM

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Basic PC Literacy

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Health Data Systems/Standards

Credit Hours: 

3.00

1st Spring

Anatomy & Physiology II (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Medical Terminology II

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Health Law & Ethics

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Critical Thinking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Quantitative Literacy (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Summer

Interpersonal Communication (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Pathophysiology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
General Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Fall

Principles of Disease

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Health Care Statistics

Credit Hours: 

3.00
ICD Coding

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Prof Practice Exp I

Credit Hours: 

1.00
Computers in Health Care

Credit Hours: 

2.00

2nd Spring

CPT/Other Coding Systems

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Reimbursement Methodology

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Professional Issues

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Quality Management

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Professional Practice Exp III

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Professional Practice Exp. II

Credit Hours: 

1.00
Management Principles in HIT

Credit Hours: 

3.00

The Histotechnology curriculum provides individuals with the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare tissue specimens for microscopic examination using various stains and dyes to identify tissue and cell structures.

Course work emphasizes scientific concepts related to laboratory testing, quality assurance, histology, microscopy, and other related topics.

Graduates may be eligible to take the national examination given by the Board of Certification of the American Society for Clinical Pathology. Employment opportunities include pathology laboratories in hospitals and clinics and medical or research laboratories.

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  1. Perform laboratory procedures safely.
  2. Integrate legal and ethical principles into job responsibilities.
  3. Recognize, analyze, and solve problems related to laboratory procedures.
  4. Demonstrate the academic knowledge and technical skills for entry-level histologic technicians.
  5. Perform mathematical calculations related to generating laboratory results.
  6. Read and understand laboratory manuals and related technical materials.
  7. Use current technologies to access and process information.
  8. Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills with consumers and coworkers. 
  9. Display professionalism by projecting a positive attitude, working as a team member, showing initiative and responsibility, and displaying sensitivity to cultural diversity.

Technical Standards:

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability, and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of Histotechnology. These technical standards are published in the Student Handbook, and/or are available from program faculty.

Admission Requirements:

Applicants for admission to the Histotechnology program must:

  1. Complete the requirements for admission as described in the Cancer Information Management & Histotechnology Packet.

Criminal Background Check

A criminal background check and drug screen testing are required by the clinical site prior to participation in the clinical component.

If any clinical facility refuses to allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in that clinical agency, the student will not be able to progress in the program.

Progression Requirements

A student must meet all prerequisite and corequisite HTO course requirements with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress in the program.

Histotechnology
: Associate in Applied Science Degree Program

NOTE: Special legal requirements exist which may limit the ability of an individual to obtain clinical experience, employment, or certification in Histotechnology. Prospective students should obtain additional information from a College counselor or program faculty member prior to seeking admission.

1st Fall

Basic Anatomy & Physiology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

5.00
General, Organic & Biochemistry (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
General Organic & Biochemistry Lab (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

1.00
Quantitative Literacy (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

1st Spring

General Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Interpersonal Communication (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Microbiology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Pathophysiology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Summer

Critical Thinking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Introduction to Histotechnology

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Fall

Histology

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Histotechniques

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Histochemistry

Credit Hours: 

5.00

2nd Spring

Histopathology

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Histotechnology Clinical

Credit Hours: 

8.00
Professional Issues

Credit Hours: 

3.00

The Human Services Technology program provides quality-learning opportunities to prepare individuals for entry-level positions in institutions and agencies, which provide social, community, and educational services. Along with core courses, students take courses, which prepare them for specialization in specific human services areas.

Students will take courses from a variety of disciplines. Emphasis in core courses is placed on development of relevant knowledge, skills, and attitudes in human services. Fieldwork experience will provide opportunities for application of knowledge and skills learned in the classroom.

Graduates should qualify for positions in mental health, childcare, family services, social services, rehabilitation, correction, and educational agencies. Graduates choosing to continue their education may select from a variety of transfer programs at senior public and private institutions.

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a fundamental understanding of human nature and development from a biological, psychological, and sociological perspective as related to Human Services profession.
  2. Demonstrate a broad-based understanding of human behavior and social relationships.
  3. Apply knowledge of culture and society to social institutions and problem solving, while paying attention to cross-cultural differences.
  4. Employ scientific methods to analyze information, which can be useful for understanding and addressing individual problems as related the Human Services profession.
  5. Demonstrate critical reasoning and problem solving, communication skills, and ethical decision making as tools for working and living.

Technical Standards: 

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of human services. These technical standards are published in the Student Handbook and/or are available from program faculty.

Admission Requirements: 

Students must be admitted to the Human Services program prior to taking Human Service core courses.

Applicants for admission to the Human Services program will need to complete the requirements for admission as described in the Human Services Packet.

Transfer Credit for Human Services Courses

The decision regarding transfer credit for human services courses is made by the Director of the program in consultation with members of the faculty and the Associate Dean. Syllabi for courses for which credit is requested will be required.

Students wishing to transfer 15 credit hours or more in Human Services (HSE or SAB) to DCCC must obtain a recommendation letter from the parent institution. See your academic advisor for the appropriate form. 

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of a human services professional. These technical standards are published in the application packet for admission to the program and the Student Handbook and/or are available from academic advisor or program faculty.

Progression Requirements

A student must meet all prerequisite and corequisite HSE, PSY, ENG, CIS, and SAB course requirements with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress in the program.

Human Services Technology
: Associate in Applied Science Degree Program

1st Fall

Introduction to Human Services

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Group Process I

Credit Hours: 

2.00
General Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Introduction to Computers (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

1st Spring

Interviewing Techniques

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Substance Abuse Overview

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Case Management

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Quantitative Literacy (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Introduction to Ethics (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Summer

Developmental Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Conflict Resolution

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Introduction to Sociology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Fall

Human Services Issues

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Counseling

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Crisis Intervention

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Argument-Based Research (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Critical Thinking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Spring

HSE Clinical Supervis I

Credit Hours: 

1.00
HSE Clinical Exp I

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Family Systems

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Public Speaking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Behavioral Modification

Credit Hours: 

3.00

The Medical Assisting curriculum prepares multi-skilled health care professionals qualified to perform administrative, clinical, and laboratory procedures.

Course work includes instruction in scheduling appointments, coding and processing insurance accounts, billing, collections, medical transcription, computer operations; assisting with examinations/treatments, performing routine laboratory procedures, electrocardiography, supervised medication administration; and ethical/legal issues associated with patient care.

Graduates of CAAHEP accredited medical assisting programs may be eligible to sit for the American Association of Medical Assistants Certification Examination to become Certified Medical Assistants. Employment opportunities include physicians’ offices, health maintenance organizations, health departments, and hospitals.

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills with consumers and coworkers in the role of medical assistant.
  2. Use critical thinking to recognize, analyze, and solve problems related to administrative, clinical, and laboratory procedures.
  3. Understand and use policies and manuals related to administrative, clinical, and laboratory procedures.
  4. Perform mathematic calculations related to generating laboratory results and preparing and administering medications.
  5. Use current technologies in the implementation of administrative, clinical, and laboratory procedures.
  6. Demonstrate competency in the knowledge and skills required for entry-level medical assisting practice.
  7. Display professionalism by projecting a positive attitude, working as a team member, showing initiative and responsibility, and displaying sensitivity to cultural diversity.
  8. Practice in a legal and ethical manner.

Accreditation: 

The Davidson County Community College Diploma Medical Assisting Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org), upon the recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB). The address for the commission is: Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs, 1361 Park Street, Clearwater, FL 33756; telephone: 727.210.2350.

Certification Pass Rate: 85% pass rate for AAMA first time attempts in 2012.

Technical Standards: 

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of a medical assistant. These technical standards are published in the application for admission to health programs and the Student Handbook.

Admission Requirements: 

Applicants for admission to the Medical Assisting program must:

  1. Complete the requirements for admission as described in the Allied Health Packet.

Transfer Credit for Medical Assisting Courses

The decision regarding transfer credit for medical assisting courses is made by the Director of the program in consultation with members of the faculty and the Associate Dean. Syllabi for courses for which credit is requested will be required.

Progression Requirements

A student must meet all prerequisite and corequisite MED and all supporting course requirements with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress in the program.

Criminal Background Check

A criminal background check and drug screen testing are required by the clinical site prior to participation in the clinical component.

If any clinical facility refuses to allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in the clinical agency, the student will not be able to progress in the program.

Medical Assisting
: Associate in Applied Science Degree Program

NOTE: Special legal requirements exist which may limit the ability of an individual to obtain clinical experience, employment, or certification in the Medical Assisting field. Prospective students should obtain additional information from a College counselor or program faculty member prior to seeking admission.

1st Fall

Basic Anatomy & Physiology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Orientation to Medical Assisting

Credit Hours: 

1.00
Medical Law & Ethics

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Medical Terminology I

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Administrative Office Procedures I

Credit Hours: 

2.00

1st Spring

Medical Terminology II

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Administrative Office Procedures II

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Examining Room Procedures I

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Laboratory Procedures I

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Drug Therapy

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Summer

MED Clinical Practicum

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Clinical Perspectives

Credit Hours: 

1.00
Interpersonal Communication (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Fall

Quantitative Literacy (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Examining Room Procedures II

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Medical Insurance Coding

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Symptomatology

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Spring

General Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Principles of Management (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Critical Thinking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Medical Assisting: 
Diploma Program

Fall

Basic Anatomy & Physiology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Orientation to Medical Assisting

Credit Hours: 

1.00
Medical Law & Ethics

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Medical Terminology I

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Administrative Office Procedures I

Credit Hours: 

2.00

Spring

Medical Terminology II

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Administrative Office Procedures II

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Examining Room Procedures I

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Laboratory Procedures I

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Drug Therapy

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Summer

MED Clinical Practicum

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Clinical Perspectives

Credit Hours: 

1.00
Interpersonal Communication (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

The Medical Laboratory Technology curriculum prepares individuals to perform clinical laboratory procedures in chemistry, hematology, microbiology, and immunohematology that may be used in the maintenance of health and diagnosis/treatment of disease. 

Course work emphasizes mathematical and scientific concepts related to specimen collection, laboratory testing and procedures, quality assurance, and reporting/recording and interpreting findings involving tissues, blood, and body fluids.

Graduates may be eligible to take examinations given by the American Society for Clinical Pathology Board of Certification. Employment opportunities include laboratories in hospitals, medical offices, industry, and research facilities.

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills with consumers and coworkers.
  2. Recognize, analyze, and solve problems related to clinical lab procedures.
  3. Read and understand medical laboratory manuals and related technical materials.
  4. Perform mathematical calculations related to generating laboratory results.
  5. Use current technologies to access and process information.
  6. Demonstrate the academic knowledge and technical skills for entry-level medical laboratory practice.
  7. Display professionalism by projecting a positive attitude, working as a team member, showing initiative and responsibility, and displaying sensitivity to cultural diversity.
  8. Practice in a legal and ethical manner.

Accreditation: 

The Medical Laboratory Technology program is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS), 5600 N. River Road, Suite 720, Rosemont, IL 60018-5119, 773.714.8880.

Certification Pass Rate
Student outcome measures for 2012 rated 100% pass rate for ASCP BOC for first time attempts. 

Technical Standards: 

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of medical laboratory technology. These technical standards are published in the application for admission to health programs and the Student Handbook.

Admission Requirements: 

Applicants for admission to the Medical Laboratory Technology program must:

  1. Complete the requirements for admission as described in the Allied Health Packet.

Transfer Credit for Medical Laboratory Technology Courses

The decision regarding transfer credit for medical laboratory technology courses is made by the Director of the program in consultation with members of the faculty and the Associate Dean. Syllabi for courses for which credit is requested will be required.

Progression Requirements

A student must meet all prerequisite and corequisite MLT course requirements with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress in the program.

Criminal Background Check

A criminal background check and drug screen testing are required by the clinical site prior to participation in the clinical component.

If any clinical facility refuses to allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in that clinical agency, the student will not be able to progress in the program.

Medical Laboratory Technology
: Associate in Applied Science Degree Program

NOTE: Special legal requirements exist which may limit the ability of an individual to obtain clinical experience, employment, or certification in the Medical Laboratory Technology field. Prospective students should obtain additional information from a College counselor or program faculty member prior to seeking admission.

1st Fall

Quantitative Literacy (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Introduction to MLT

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Introduction to Microbiology

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Special Clinical Microbiology

Credit Hours: 

3.00

For 1st Fall either take

Basic Anatomy & Physiology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

5.00

OR BOTH

Anatomy & Physiology I (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Anatomy & Physiology II (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

4.00

1st Spring

General, Organic & Biochemistry (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
General Organic & Biochemistry Lab (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

1.00
Urinalysis & Body Fluids

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Hematology/Hemostasis I

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Immunohematology I

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Hematology/Hemostasis II

Credit Hours: 

3.00

Summer

Clinical Chemistry I

Credit Hours: 

4.00

2nd Fall

Professional Issues

Credit Hours: 

1.00
MLT Practicum I

Credit Hours: 

8.00
Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Spring

Interpersonal Communication (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
General Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
MLT Practicum II

Credit Hours: 

6.00
Critical Thinking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

The Nursing Assistant curriculum prepares individuals to work under the supervision of licensed health care professionals in performing nursing care and services for persons of all ages.

Course work emphasizes growth and development throughout the life span, personal care, vital signs, communication, nutrition, medical asepsis, therapeutic activities, accident and fire safety, household environment and equipment management; family resources and services; and employment skills.

Graduates of this curriculum may be eligible to be listed on the registry as a Nursing Assistant I and Nursing Assistant II. They may be employed in home health agencies, hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, extended care facilities, and doctors’ offices.

Upon successful completion of the Nursing Assistant program, the graduate should be able to:

  1. Function within the role and scope of practice of a Nursing Assistant as a member of the healthcare team. 
  2. Identify psychological and social needs of clients in a variety of healthcare settings.
  3. Demonstrate skills necessary to qualify as Nursing Assistant I with the North Carolina Nurse Aide I Registry.
  4. Demonstrate skills necessary to qualify as a Nursing Assistant II with the North Carolina Board of Nursing.

Technical Standards: 

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of a nursing assistant. These technical standards are published in the application packet for admission to health programs and the Student Handbook.

Admission Requirements: 

Students must be admitted to the Nursing Assistant program prior to taking NAS 101, NAS 102, NAS 103, or NAS 106.

Applicants for admission to the Nursing Assistant program must:

  1. Complete the College’s assessment process and achieved acceptable scores or been exempted from placement.
  2. Demonstrate physical and emotional health status compatible with the ability to provide safe care to clients and to obtain acceptance for clinical training.

Progression Requirements

A student must meet all prerequisite and corequisite NAS course requirements with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress in the program.

Criminal Background Check

A criminal background check and drug screen testing are required by the clinical site prior to participation in the clinical component.
If any clinical facility refuses to allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in that clinical agency, the student will not be able to progress in the program.

Certificate - Nursing Assistant (High School Career and College Promise)

What it’s about

The Nursing Assistant curriculum prepares individuals to work under the supervision of licensed healthcare professionals in performing nursing care and services for persons of all ages. They may be employed in home health agencies, hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, extended care facilities, and doctors’ offices.

What you can get

Upon successful completion of all courses in this CCP pathway, the student will be awarded a Certificate in Nursing Assistant from DCCC. After completing NAS 101, the student will be eligible to take the Nurse Aide I state test for listing as an NAI on the Nurse Aide Registry (additional cost). After completion of NAS 102, students will be eligible to take the Nurse Aide II state exam.

Program specific details

Tuition and Fees FREE

Textbooks - $175.00
Student Course Packet - FREE
Student Kit - $5.00
BLS for Healthcare Providers, Manual Blood Pressure Cuff and Stethoscope - $80.00 (May be provided by High School)

Immunizations, Criminal Background/Drug Screen (costs vary based on the individual) - $105.00

ESTIMATED TOTAL COST (Student Responsible) $365.00
*Costs subject to change.

Minimum Placement Test Scores

Reading & Sentence Skills - 165
Math Score - 7
Math Modules - 010-050

After High School

Complete Certificate: NAS 102 Nursing Assistant II (Fall semester after graduation)
After Certificate: Ready for State Test 

High School Senior Year

Nursing Assistant I

Credit Hours: 

6.00
Home Health Care

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Geriatrics

Credit Hours: 

3.00

After High School

Nursing Assistant II

Credit Hours: 

6.00

The Paralegal Technology curriculum prepares individuals to work under the supervision of attorneys by performing routine legal tasks and assisting with substantive legal work. A paralegal/legal assistant may not practice law, give legal advice, or represent clients in a court of law.

Course work includes substantive and procedural legal knowledge in the areas of civil litigation, legal research and writing, real estate, family law, wills, estates, trusts, and commercial law. Required courses also include subjects such as English, mathematics, and computer utilization.

Graduates are trained to assist attorneys in probate work, investigations, public records search, drafting and filing legal documents, research, and office management. Employment opportunities are available in private law firms, governmental agencies, banks, insurance agencies, and other business organizations.

Upon successful completion of this program, students should be able to:

  1. Communicate effectively by listening, speaking, and writing.
    a. Write a research memorandum for an attorney’s review.
    b. Draft documents for review and use by an attorney during the pleading, discovery, and trial phases of civil litigation.
    c. Draft domestic law documents for the review of the attorney.
  2. Identify, analyze, research, and evaluate legal issues.
    a. Use critical thinking to define legal questions, research them, interpret statutory and case law, and properly cite legal authorities.
    b. Distinguish between proper paralegal functions and the unauthorized practice of law, and identify the legal and ethical restrictions inherent in the practice of law.
    c. Research and summarize basic North Carolina civil, criminal, domestic, property, business, and estate law concepts.
    d. Assist an attorney in performing title searches and preparing residential loan closing documents.
    e. Complete the necessary forms for Chapter 7 bankruptcy under the supervision of an attorney.
  3. Work ethically and effectively with diverse populations.
    a. Perform appropriately in a legal team, which includes attorneys, paralegals, and support personnel.b. Demonstrate integrity, persistence and time management in a beginning paralegal position with a private law firm, business, or governmental entity..

Paralegal Technology: 
Associate in Applied Science Degree Program

1st Fall

Introduction to Paralegal Study

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Legal Research/Writing I

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Civil Litigation I

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Introduction to Computers (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Business Law I (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

1st Spring

Legal Research/Writing II

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Civil Litigation II

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Medical Evidence Analysis

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Civil Injuries

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Critical Thinking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Fall

Real Property I

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Wills, Estates & Trusts

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Commercial Law I

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Elder Law

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Quantitative Literacy (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Criminal Law

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Spring

Real Property II

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Ethics & Professionalism

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Family Law

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Professional Research & Reporting (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
General Psychology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Co-Op Work Experience I

Credit Hours: 

1.00

The Pharmacy Technology program prepares individuals to assist the pharmacist in duties that a technician can legally perform and to function within the boundaries prescribed by the pharmacist and the employment agency.

Students will prepare prescription medications, mix intravenous solutions and other specialized medications, update patient profiles, maintain inventories, package medications in unit-dose or medi-card form, and gather data used by pharmacists to monitor drug therapy.

Employment opportunities include retail, hospitals, nursing homes, research laboratories, wholesale drug companies, and pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities. Graduates from the program may be eligible to take the National Certification Examination to become a certified pharmacy technician.

Upon successful completion of this program, the student should be able to perform the following functions under the supervision of a registered pharmacist. These competencies are designed to meet the requirements of the American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists (ASHP) Standards of Pharmacy Technician Training Programs.

  1. Demonstrate the written and oral communication skills required for safe and legal practice in the role of pharmacy technician.
  2. Demonstrate the critical thinking skills necessary for safe preparation and distribution of medication. 
  3. Read and understand policies and other print materials related to safe preparation and distribution of medication.
  4. Perform mathematical calculations needed to safely prepare medications and solutions. 
  5. Use current technologies to prepare, store, inventory, and distribute medications.
  6. Demonstrate the academic knowledge and technical skills necessary for safe preparation, storage, and distribution of medications.
  7. Deal effectively with others by displaying a positive attitude, working as a team member, showing initiative and responsibility, and displaying sensitivity to cultural diversity.
  8. Practice in a legal and ethical manner.

Accreditation: 

The Pharmacy Technology program is seeking accreditation by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), 7272 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814, 866.279.0681.

Technical Standards: 

In addition to DCCC requirements and course objectives, there are professional standards that encompass communication, motor skills, sensory and cognitive ability and professional conduct that are essential for the competent study and practice of pharmacy technology. Technical standards are published in the application for admission to health programs and the General Catalog/Student Handbook and/or available from program faculty.

Admission Requirements: 

Students must be admitted to the Pharmacy Technology program prior to taking Pharmacy (PHM) courses with a laboratory component (PHM 111, PHM 118). Qualified applicants are admitted to the program based on selective ranking criteria.

  • Applicants for admission to the Pharmacy Technology Diploma program will need to complete the requirements for admission as described in the Allied Health Packet. 

Readmission Policy

Re-entry into the Pharmacy Technology program is contingent upon space being available in the laboratory component of the program. Qualified applicants re-enter with appropriate placement as determined by the applicant’s prior academic record and/or Pharmacy Technology curriculum changes. Readmission to the program is limited to one time.

Transfer Credit for Pharmacy Technology Courses

The decision regarding transfer credit for pharmacy technology courses is made by the Director of the program in consultation with members of the faculty and the Associate Dean. Syllabi for courses for which credit is requested will be required.                                          

Progression Requirements

A student must meet all prerequisite and corequisite PHM course requirements with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress in the program.

Probation and Suspension

Pharmacy Technology students are subject to the same probation and suspension policies as all other students enrolled in the College. In addition, a student is suspended from the program if the student receives a final grade of “D” or “F” in any required course in the Pharmacy Technology curriculum or receives a final clinical evaluation of “unsatisfactory” in any PHM course. 

Criminal Background Check

A criminal background check and drug screen testing are required by the clinical site prior to participation in the clinical component.

If any clinical facility refuses to allow the student to participate in clinical experiences in that clinical agency, the student will not be able to progress in the program.

Registration and National Certification

The NC State Board of Pharmacy requires registration in order to work as a pharmacy technician in North Carolina: www.ncbop.org

National certification of pharmacy technicians is offered through the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB) and is currently voluntary in North Carolina: www.ptcb.org   To be eligible for certification and take the Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam, the applicant will have received a high school diploma, a High School Equivalency or the foreign equivalent by the application deadline and have never been convicted of a felony.

Pharmacy Technology: 
Associate in Applied Science Degree Program

1st Fall

Interpersonal Communication (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Expository Writing (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Introduction to Pharmacy

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Pharmacy Practice I

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Pharmacy Calculations

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Pharmacology I

Credit Hours: 

3.00

1st Spring

Sterile Products

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Pharmacology II

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Trends in Pharmacy

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Pharmacy Clinical

Credit Hours: 

2.00
Pharmacy Clinical

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Pharmacy Professional Practice

Credit Hours: 

2.00

Summer

Critical Thinking (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Fall

Basic Anatomy & Physiology (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

5.00
Precalculus Algebra (CAA)

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Pharm Dosage Forms

Credit Hours: 

3.00
Hospital Pharmacy

Credit Hours: 

4.00
Community Pharmacy

Credit Hours: 

3.00

2nd Spring

Professional Issues

Credit Hours: 

3.00